Hunter_S._Thompson_495x400

It’s Not The Goal But The Man…

What is the biggest life mistake you can make? Short of getting yourself killed, what is the one thing you want to avoid doing?

There are lots of ways to answer that question. But on a philosophical level, I would argue the biggest mistake you can make is this: Not being true to yourself.

Almost all other mistakes can be learned from, bounced back from, or otherwise overcome. (Even blowing up a trading account has its tuition merits.)

But not being true to yourself — that’s the “big mistake” that forever robs you… permanently weakens you… atrophies your soul.

Below is something you should read. It’s a letter from Hunter S. Thompson — yep, that Hunter S. Thompson, of “Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas” fame — written to his friend Hume Logan in 1958.

The topic is “what to do with your life.

To give advice to a man who asks what to do with his life implies something very close to egomania. To presume to point a man to the right and ultimate goal — to point with a trembling finger in the RIGHT direction is something only a fool would take upon himself.

 “To be, or not to be: that is the question: Whether ’tis nobler in the mind to suffer the slings and arrows of outrageous fortune, or to take arms against a sea of troubles…”

And indeed, that IS the question: whether to float with the tide, or to swim for a goal. It is a choice we must all make consciously or unconsciously at one time in our lives. So few people understand this! Think of any decision you’ve ever made which had a bearing on your future: I may be wrong, but I don’t see how it could have been anything but a choice however indirect — between the two things I’ve mentioned: the floating or the swimming.

The answer — and, in a sense, the tragedy of life — is that we seek to understand the goal and not the man. We set up a goal which demands of us certain things: and we do these things. We adjust to the demands of a concept which CANNOT be valid. When you were young, let us say that you wanted to be a fireman. I feel reasonably safe in saying that you no longer want to be a fireman. Why? Because your perspective has changed. It’s not the fireman who has changed, but you.

Every man is the sum total of his reactions to experience. As your experiences differ and multiply, you become a different man, and hence your perspective changes. This goes on and on. Every reaction is a learning process; every significant experience alters your perspective.

So it would seem foolish, would it not, to adjust our lives to the demands of a goal we see from a different angle every day? How could we ever hope to accomplish anything other than galloping neurosis?

The answer, then, must not deal with goals at all, or not with tangible goals, anyway. It would take reams of paper to develop this subject to fulfillment. God only knows how many books have been written on “the meaning of man” and that sort of thing, and god only knows how many people have pondered the subject. (I use the term “god only knows” purely as an expression.) There’s very little sense in my trying to give it up to you in the proverbial nutshell, because I’m the first to admit my absolute lack of qualifications for reducing the meaning of life to one or two paragraphs.

To put our faith in tangible goals would seem to be, at best, unwise. So we do not strive to be firemen, we do not strive to be bankers, nor policemen, nor doctors. WE STRIVE TO BE OURSELVES.

But don’t misunderstand me. I don’t mean that we can’t BE firemen, bankers, or doctors—but that we must make the goal conform to the individual, rather than make the individual conform to the goal. In every man, heredity and environment have combined to produce a creature of certain abilities and desires—including a deeply ingrained need to function in such a way that his life will be MEANINGFUL. A man has to BE something; he has to matter.

As I see it then, the formula runs something like this: a man must choose a path which will let his ABILITIES function at maximum efficiency toward the gratification of his DESIRES. In doing this, he is fulfilling a need (giving himself identity by functioning in a set pattern toward a set goal) he avoids frustrating his potential (choosing a path which puts no limit on his self-development), and he avoids the terror of seeing his goal wilt or lose its charm as he draws closer to it (rather than bending himself to meet the demands of that which he seeks, he has bent his goal to conform to his own abilities and desires).

In short, he has not dedicated his life to reaching a pre-defined goal, but he has rather chosen a way of life he KNOWS he will enjoy. The goal is absolutely secondary: it is the functioning toward the goal which is important. And it seems almost ridiculous to say that a man MUST function in a pattern of his own choosing; for to let another man define your own goals is to give up one of the most meaningful aspects of life — the definitive act of will which makes a man an individual.

A man who procrastinates in his CHOOSING will inevitably have his choice made for him by circumstance. So if you now number yourself among the disenchanted, then you have no choice but to accept things as they are, or to seriously seek something else. But beware of looking for goals: look for a way of life. Decide how you want to live and then see what you can do to make a living WITHIN that way of life. But you say, “I don’t know where to look; I don’t know what to look for.”

And there’s the crux. Is it worth giving up what I have to look for something better? I don’t know—is it? Who can make that decision but you? But even by DECIDING TO LOOK, you go a long way toward making the choice.

I’m not trying to send you out “on the road” in search of Valhalla, but merely pointing out that it is not necessary to accept the choices handed down to you by life as you know it. There is more to it than that — no one HAS to do something he doesn’t want to do for the rest of his life.

Your challenge, if you are willing to accept it, is to live the most fulfilling life possible, the most meaningful life possible. Goals and plans are just a flexible means to that end.

But who determines what “fulfilling” means? Who determines what “meaningful” means?

You and only you.

Being true to yourself means following the compass of your heart… having the guts to go where it leads… and doing everything you can to enable the destiny you choose.

The alternative? Forever wondering what might have been.

Reminder: The doors to our Collective, our institutional-grade research, and training service are open until Sunday at midnite. If you’re interested in checking us out then just click the link below and sign up. I’m looking forward to having you in the group! And, as always, don’t hesitate to shoot me any comments/questions.

Join The Collective

Stay safe out there and keep your head on a swivel.

All content on our website, emails, social media posts, comments on other websites or other material generated by Macro Ops is intended for general information purposes only. None of our content should be considered to be an invitation to buy or sell securities. No content from Macro Ops should be considered individual investment advice. Macro Ops cannot guarantee accuracy of information on the site. Contributors to Macro Ops may have trading or investing positions in the securities mentioned. You should assume that we are likely to take trading positions in the stocks, options, futures or other securities we write about. Macro Ops does not have an obligation to inform readers of a change of opinion on securities mentioned or on a change in our trading positions on securities mentioned. Macro Ops assumes no liability for losses incurred from readers trading securities that are mentioned in any of our content. None of the media brands in the “Featured In” section have directly endorsed our products or services. For full disclaimer, please visit: https://macro-ops.com/terms-of-service/ Copyright © 2020 Foundation Alpha LLC. All rights reserved. - powered by Enfold WordPress Theme